Olive Wood, the Blog
 
I have to admit, I wasn’t completely sold on the idea. Starting a business, that is. It all started with my brother-in-law, Kiko. You see, he has a passion for business. Since marrying my dear husband (the “Penguin”), I’ve become quite used to the odd bits and pieces of Tunisia (his home land) that somehow find their way into our home. Yes, the Tunisian flag is hanging on our wall. We also have the requisite camel portrait. (Note: my husband assures me that despite the prevalence of Tunisian wall art depicting camels, they are, in fact, not its national symbol). Oh, and then there’s the plastic Kewpie-doll dressed as a Tunisian bride riding a stuffed camel sitting on top of our bookshelf.

We also have some truly wonderful things from Tunisia in our home. Don’t even get me started on my mother-in-law’s makrough, this incredible, crumbly, date-filled cookie. It’s like a Fig Newton, no, it’s more like the Fig Newton’s classier, sexier sister. If we’re lucky, maybe at some point Nini (that’s my sister-in-law) will share the secret of the makrough. There’s also the spices, oh the spices! I’ll never cook with American chili powder or cumin again! Wait, where was I? Oh! Right! Olive wood.

So, here’s the thing. It turns out that Tunisia, this small country tucked away in the Mediterranean, is the second-largest holder of olive trees in the world, right after Spain. And like all things Tunisian, it wasn’t too long before Kiko finagled some olive wood our way. If you’ve never held olive wood before, well, it’s a treat. It’s smooth and cool to the touch. The grain of the wood is mesmerizing. And the smell (yes, it smells like olive oil) is tantalizing.

It turns out that olive wood has been in use for centuries in Tunisia. Who knew? (Ok, well everyone in the house expect for me, the lone American, knew…). And it also turns out that Kiko has the hook up. It wasn’t too long before we were convinced we had a product we believed in, something we wanted to share with others, and Leggenda Didone was founded!

If you wish to succeed, you should use persistence as your good friend, experience as your reference, prudence as your brother and hope as your sentry.

Reply

At first, two iron wires connected each pair of telephones. Then switchboards brought phone wires into one location. Other inventions - the vacuum tube to amplify sound, and coaxial cables to link long distances on land and under the seas -- greatly expanded phone service. Transistors replaced the old vacuum tubes, and by the 1960s communications satellites eliminated the necessity of landlines. Today, bundles of glass fibers carry calls on laser beams of light.

Reply
3/31/2011

So, when the government of France awarded him the Volta Prize for inventing the telephone, he combined this monetary award with the money hye made from selling the patent on another invention to establish the Volta Bureau in Washington, D. C. . Its purpose was to fund research on deafness. Today, it is called the Alexander Graham Bell Association. Its role has been changed to providing the latest information to the deaf of the world on how best to cope with their disability.

Reply
7/30/2011

<a href="http://holylandolivewood.com/">Holy Land Olive Wood Crafts </a>- Truly Unique Holy Land Olive Wood Crafts, Holy Gifts
Mother of Pearl,
Dead Sea Cosmetics and Religious Icons

Reply
7/30/2011

Truly Unique Holy Land Olive Wood Crafts, Holy Gifts.http://holylandolivewood.com/

Reply

Volta Prize for inventing the telephone, he combined this monetary award with the money hye made from selling the patent on another invention to establish the Volta Bureau in Washington, D. C. . Its purpose was to fund research on deafness. Today

Reply



Leave a Reply.


script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-18289026-3']); _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); (function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();